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CMSC INforMS: Genentech’s Ocrelizumab to Show Efficacy in People with PPMS in Large Phase III Study

Sunday, September 27, 2015   (0 Comments)
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Genentech’s Ocrelizumab First Investigational Medicine to Show Efficacy in People with Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis in Large Phase III Study

  • Phase III study meets primary endpoint in debilitating form of multiple sclerosis with no approved treatments
  • Ocrelizumab is the first investigational medicine to show positive study results in both primary progressive and relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis
  • Genentech will submit data to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for both forms of multiple sclerosis in early 2016

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. -- September 27, 2015 -- Genentech, a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), today announced positive results from a pivotal Phase III study that evaluated the investigational medicine ocrelizumab in people with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). The study (called ORATORIO) met its primary endpoint, showing treatment with ocrelizumab significantly reduced the progression of clinical disability sustained for at least 12 weeks compared with placebo, as measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS).

Overall, the incidence of adverse events associated with ocrelizumab was similar to placebo; the most common adverse events were mild-to-moderate infusion-related reactions. The incidence of serious adverse events associated with ocrelizumab, including serious infections, was also similar to placebo.

People with the primary progressive form of MS typically experience symptoms that continuously worsen after the onset of their disease, and there are no approved treatments for this debilitating condition, said Sandra Horning, M.D., chief medical officer and head of Global Product Development. Ocrelizumab is the first investigational medicine to show a clinically meaningful and statistically significant effect on the progression of disease in primary progressive MS.

The positive study results observed with ocrelizumab in both people with PPMS (ORATORIO) as well as those with relapsing forms of MS (OPERA I and OPERA II) validate the hypothesis that B cells are central to the underlying biology of the disease.

Top-line data from the ORATORIO study will be presented as a late-breaking abstract at the 31st congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) by Xavier Montalban, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the Scientific Steering Committee of the ORATORIO study and professor of Neurology and Neuroimmunology at Vall d’Hebron University Hospital and Research Institute, Barcelona, Spain on Saturday, October 10th (Abstract #228, 8:52 - 9:03 am CET) in Barcelona, Spain.

Additionally, Phase III results in people with relapsing MS (OPERA I and OPERA II studies) will be presented at ECTRIMS by Stephen Hauser, M.D., chair of the Scientific Steering Committee of the OPERA studies and chair of the Department of Neurology at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine on Friday, October 9th (Abstract #190, 14:40 - 14:52 pm CET).

Genentech plans to pursue marketing authorization for ocrelizumab in relapsing MS and in PPMS. Data from the OPERA I and II studies and from the ORATORIO study will be submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in early 2016.

About the ORATORIO study
ORATORIO is a Phase III, randomized, double-blind, global multi-center study evaluating the efficacy and safety of ocrelizumab (600 mg administered by intravenous infusion every six months; given as two 300 mg infusions two weeks apart) compared with placebo in 732 people with PPMS.i The primary endpoint of the ORATORIO study was time to onset of confirmed disability progression (CDP), defined as an increase in EDSS that is sustained for at least 12 weeks.

About ocrelizumab
Ocrelizumab is an investigational, humanized monoclonal antibody designed to selectively target CD20-positive B cells. CD20-positive B cells are a specific type of immune cell thought to be a key contributor to myelin (nerve cell insulation and support) and axonal (nerve cell) damage, which can result in disability in people with MS. Based on preclinical studies, ocrelizumab binds to CD20 cell surface proteins expressed on certain B cells, but not on stem cells or plasma cells, and therefore important functions of the immune system may be preserved.

In addition to ORATORIO, the Phase III clinical development program for ocrelizumab includes OPERA I and OPERA II, which are randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, global multi-center studies in people with relapsing forms of MS.[2],[2]

About multiple sclerosis
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease that affects an estimated 2.3 million people around the world, for which there is currently no cure.[3],[4] MS occurs when the immune system abnormally attacks the insulation and support around the nerve cells (myelin sheath) in the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves, causing inflammation and consequent damage.[5],[6] Damage to these nerve cells can cause a wide range of symptoms, including muscle weakness, fatigue and difficulty seeing, and may eventually lead to disability.[4] Most people with MS experience their first symptom between 20 and 40 years of age, making the disease the leading cause of non-traumatic disability in younger adults.[7],[8]

Relapsing MS is the most common form of the disease. Disease activity and progression can occur even when people do not show signs or symptoms of MS, despite available relapsing MS treatments. Primary progressive MS (PPMS) is a debilitating form of the disease marked by steadily worsening symptoms but typically without distinct relapses (periods of time when symptoms flare) or periods of remission.[9] Approximately one in 10 people with MS are diagnosed with the primary progressive form of the disease. There are no approved treatments for PPMS.

About Genentech in Neuroscience
Neuroscience is a major focus of research and development at Genentech and Roche. The company’s goal is to develop treatment options based on the biology of the nervous system to help improve the lives of people with chronic and potentially devastating diseases. Our neuroscience research and development program includes more than a dozen investigational medicines in clinical development for diseases that include multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, spinal muscular atrophy, Parkinson’s disease, Down syndrome and autism.

About Genentech
Founded more than 35 years ago, Genentech is a leading biotechnology company that discovers, develops, manufactures and commercializes medicines to treat patients with serious or life-threatening medical conditions. The company, a member of the Roche Group, has headquarters in South San Francisco, California. For additional information about the company, please visit http://www.gene.com.

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References
[1] F. Hoffmann-La Roche. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01194570. National Library of Medicine. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01194570.
[2] F. Hoffmann-La Roche. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01247324 and NCT01412333. National Library of Medicine. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01247324 and https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01412333.
[3] Multiple Sclerosis International Federation. (2013). Atlas of MS 2013. Available at: http://www.msif.org/about-us/advocacy/atlas/.
[4] National Institutes of Health-National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. (2015). Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through Research. Available at: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/multiple_sclerosis/detail_multiple_sclerosis.htm#280373215.
[5] Constant SL. (1999). B lymphocytes as antigen-presenting cells for CD4+ T cell priming in vivo. J Immunol, 162(10):5695-5703.
[6] Crawford A, et al. (2006). Primary T cell expansion and differentiation in vivo requires antigen presentation by B cells. J Immunol, 176(6):3498-3506.
[7] Murray TJ. (2006). Diagnosis and treatment of multiple sclerosis. BMJ, 322 (7540):525-527.
[8] MS International Federation. What is MS? Available at http://www.msif.org/about-ms/what-is-ms/.
[9] MS International Federation. Types of MS. Available at: http://www.msif.org/about-ms/types-of-ms/.

Media Contact:
Tara Iannuccillo (650) 467-6800

Investor Contacts:
Stefan Foser
(650) 467-2016

Karl Mahler
011 41 61 687 8503

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The industry news information and articles are for informational purposes only, and are not intended to represent any trends, partnerships, commitments, or research of the Consortium of MS Centers or any of it's members in any way whatsoever, nor should any party be libel in any way to the reader or to any other person, firm or corporation reading this industry news section. Although the CMSC site includes links providing direct access to other Internet sites, CMSC takes no responsibility for the content or information contained on those other sites, and does not exert any editorial or other control over those other sites. CMSC is providing information and services on the Internet as a benefit and service in furtherance of CMSC's nonprofit and tax-exempt status. CMSC makes no representations about the suitability of this information and these services for any purpose.


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